Oral Cancer

What Are the Symptoms of Oral Cancer?

Who Gets Oral Cancer?

What Is the Outlook for People With Oral Cancer?

How Is Oral Cancer Diagnosed?

How Is Oral Cancer Treated?

What Can I Do to Prevent Oral Cancer?

Cancer is defined as the uncontrollable growth of cells that invade and cause damage to surrounding tissue. Oral cancer appears as a growth or sore in the mouth that does not go away. Oral cancer, which includes cancers of the lips, tongue, cheeks, floor of the mouth, hard and soft palate, sinuses,and pharynx (throat), can be life threatening if not diagnosed and treated early.

What Are the Symptoms of Oral Cancer?

The most common symptoms of oral cancer include:

  • Swellings/thickenings, lumps or bumps, rough spots/crusts/or eroded areas on the lips, gums, or other areas inside the mouth.
  • The development of velvety white, red, or speckled (white and red) patches in the mouth.
  • Unexplained bleeding in the mouth.
  • Unexplained numbness, loss of feeling, or pain/ tenderness in any area of the face, mouth, or neck.
  • Persistent sores on the face, neck, or mouth that bleed easily and do not heal within 2 weeks.
  • A soreness or feeling that something is caught in the back of the throat.
  • Difficulty chewing or swallowing, speaking, or moving the jaw or tongue.
  • Hoarseness, chronic sore throat, or change in voice.
  • Ear pain.
  • A change in the way your teeth or dentures fit together.
  • Dramatic weight loss.
  • If you notice any of these changes, contact your dentist or health care professional immediately.

Who Gets Oral Cancer?

Risk factors for the development of oral cance include:

  • Smoking . Cigarette, cigar, or pipe smokers are six times more likely than nonsmokers to develop oral cancers.
  • Smokeless tobacco users. Users of dip, snuff, or chewing tobacco products are 50 times more likely to develop cancers of the cheek, gums, and lining of the lips.
  • Excessive consumption of alcohol. Oral cancers are about six times more common in drinkers than in nondrinkers.
  • Family history of cancer.
  • Excessive sun exposure, especially at a young age.
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV). Certain HPV strains are etiologic risk factors for  Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC).

It is important to note that over 25% of all oral cancers occur in people who do not smoke and who only drink alcohol occasionally.What Is the Outlook for People With Oral Cancer? The overall 1-year survival rate for patients with all stages of oral cavity and pharynx cancers is 81%. The 5- and 10-year survival rates are 56% and 41%, respectively.

How Is Oral Cancer Diagnosed?

As part of your routine dental exam, your dentist will conduct an oral cancer screening exam. More specifically, your dentist will feel for any lumps or irregular tissue changes in your neck, head, face, and oral cavity. When examining your mouth, your dentist will look for any sores or discolored tissue as well as check for any signs and symptoms mentioned above. A biopsy may be needed to determine the makeup of a suspicious looking area.

There are different types of biopsies and your doctor can determine which one is best. Many doctors don’t use brush biopsies because while they’re very easy, they still need a scalpel biopsy to confirm the results if the brush biopsy is positive. Also there are different types of scalpel biopsies, incisional and excisional, depending whether only a piece or the whole area is needed to determine what the nature of the  problem is. Some doctors preform these biopsies with lasers.

How Is Oral Cancer Treated?

Oral cancer is treated the same way many other cancers are treated — with surgery to remove the cancerous growth, followed by radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy (drug treatments) to destroy any remaining cancer cells.

What Can I Do to Prevent Oral Cancer?

To prevent oral cancer:

  • Don’t smoke or use any tobacco products and drink alcohol in moderation (and refrain from binge drinking).
  • Eat a well balanced diet.
  • Limit your exposure to the sun. Repeated exposure increases the risk of cancer on the lip, especially the lower lip. When in the sun, use UV-A/B-blocking sun protective lotions on your skin, as well as your lips. You can take an active role in detecting oral cancer early, should it occur, by doing the following:
  • Conduct a self exam at least once a month

    Using a bright light and a mirror, look and feel your lips and front of your gums. Tilt your head back and look at and feel the roof of your mouth. Pull your checks out to view the inside of your mouth, the lining of your cheeks, and the back gums.

    Pull out your tongue and look at all surfaces; examine the floor of your mouth. Look at the back of your throat. Feel for lumps or enlarged lymph nodes in both sides of your neck and under your lower jaw. Call your dentist’s office immediately if you notice any changes in the appearance of your mouth or any of the signs and symptoms mentioned above.

  • See your dentist on a regular schedule

    Even though you may be conducting frequent self exams, sometimes dangerous spots or sores in the mouth can be very tiny and difficult to see on your own.. During your next dental appointment, ask your dentist to perform an oral exam. Early detection can improve the chance of successful treatment.

 

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Dr. Deepak Dawar

BDS , 11+ years experience

Dentist , Implantologist , Cosmetic/Aesthetic Dentist